Tansy and Butternut visit Windy Bay

Watchmen’s Cabin

Tansy and Butternut Girl wondered if they would encounter Raven at Windy bay, but she wasn’t there this time….

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path

…so they went on the guided tour with another guide.

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woodland walkway

They learned about how the people protected the forest…

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Giant tree

….and visited some of the oldest denizens of the forest – like this giant Cedar…

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Spruce

…and this enormous Spruce.

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bare ground

Parts of the trail go through areas where deer have eaten the understory…

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Peering

…but the path went through the deer exclosure…

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Deer exclosure

…so they could see how abundant the understory can get (this side of the fence) when it isn’t all mowed down by the deer!

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walking

Then everybody went back to the beach…

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Passing Cloud

…and back to Passing Cloud!

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Please  click here  to see the website of Outer Shores Expeditions,

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If you want to see where Passing cloud is right now, click here!

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9 thoughts on “Tansy and Butternut visit Windy Bay

  1. I’m wondering if the elder wood denizens had any advice that they passed along to the younger crowd when they passed through. Thank you for the contemplative walk.

    • I think since Tansy and Butternut were only there a short time, they really only were able to convey a sense of respect towards the elder trees…it was a privilege to be among them.

  2. Very nice! the girls are really getting to see so much. I enjoyed looking at the enclosed area without Deer pressure. I suppose the deer have no natural enemies in the area. Those huge trees are just amazing.

  3. Can’t help but think about how comfortable Butternut girl and Tansy were climbing that giant tree…after-all, their first lives were as trees…bet they love communing with all of this fabulous nature. They look so happy.

  4. They are such good travel companions.
    The cedar tree has bark slabs removed 100 or 200 years ago for use as shelter covers, or to protect canoes from drying in the sun, or to make canoe bailers, or for many other uses. The “bare ground” photo shows faint ridges from around ancient house features, they probably were last used in the early 1800s and no wood structures survive.

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