Tempest

Constance studies the Marine Observer’s Handbook.

Constance attended the Metropolitan Opera’s live HD broadcast of The Tempest conducted by the composer, Thomas Adès.  She was almost blown away by the eponymous violent storm at the start.  She was completely riveted to her seat during the brooding machinations of Prospero (think Aragorn with tatoos) and his reluctant collaborators – the scarily ethereal Ariel and the gloomily pathetic Caliban.  It was nice to see an opera with  a happy ending of sorts – Miranda and Ferdinand falling in love adorably, and a good dose of remorse and forgiveness all round…the last haunting notes of the opera sent chills up Constance’s spine which lasted all day.  She can hardly wait for the encore performance: U.S. Encore: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 6:30 pm local time; Canada Encore: Saturday, January 12, 2013 at 12:00 pm local time.

To view Constance’s other opera reviews go to this link.

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10 thoughts on “Tempest

  1. This opera by Thomas Adès, turns Shakespeare’s play into an opera The love duet for Ferdinand and Miranda and the ending with Caliban alone while all others melt into thin air is something to watch. Constance is fortunate to be able to see such a remarkable opera…..The Tempest has always been a favorite.

    • Constance feels very fortunate, indeed. This version was breathtaking…the music is still sloshing around in her little wooden head, and was awestruck by the vision of the director Robert Lepage!

  2. Opera really isn’t my favorite form of entertainment, but I did enjoy seeing Constance’s lovely coat and hat.

    • Many of Constance’s friends are mystified by her enthusiasm for Opera… She finds it leads her to all kinds of interesting places – like into the dictionary, or the complete works of Shakespeare, or a history textbook, or even a cookbook on occasion! She also likes the opportunity to dress up – no jewels or anything, but a good excuse to wear her favourite camel hair coat, and knitted hat (made for her by a dear departed admirer).

  3. Pingback: Great Bills of Opera | Quimper Hittys

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