Chilly February Foreshore

Walk

Henrietta walked to the rocky foreshore on a chilly February morning…

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Moss Rocks

...scrambled up some green mossy rocks…

 

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Grassy path

…and walked along a grassy green path…

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Lichens

…until she arrived at the lichen-softened rocks…

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Ferns

…and the beautiful little ferns that are too pretty to sit on.

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View

Henrietta sat for a while; gazing at the Buffleheads, Goldeneyes and Merganzers diving for their breakfasts; listening to the weeping of the Widgeons, and the clanking of the Geese; sniffing at the salty air; and feeling the cool breeze on her cheeks.

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Cupboardward-bound

…what a beautiful morning walk!

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15 thoughts on “Chilly February Foreshore

  1. Thank you, Kjerstin, for sharing Henrietta’s morning walk. I feel like I’ve just had a wonderfully meditative stroll with her. Judith

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  2. So, so, beautiful. My eyes went right to Henrietta’s enchanting coat. I see carefully and cleverly created stitches that enhance the gorgeously shaded coat. Did you make it or another of your fine friends? It is very lovely, as was the morning walk.

    • We love Buffleheads! The males are very distinctive…The Spangled Drongo is a glorious name, has a nice tail, otherwise it looks a bit like a starling. My grandmother was encouraged by the man who wrote a book called “Mateship With Birds” and became a birdwatcher through his influence. I have a copy of his book that she owned, inscribed by him. I wonder if the Spangled Drongo is in there?

      • I wouldn’t be at all surprised! The drongos are particularly gorgeous; much of the plumage is sheeny and satin-like, and then there’s the matte black velvet ‘cape’ on the shoulders, plus they have that piercing red eye. They’re as elegant as an Elizabethan grandee. They’re also very aerobatic insect-eaters; at our last house we used to feed a flock of them with tiny scraps of meat tossed into the air, and they’d swoop and dive, and never a scrap hit the ground.

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